There's an old saying that goes: "If you go looking for trouble, you'll find it."

In this case, "trouble" was Stephen in Louisiana and Maddie Perry found him pretty quickly after broadcasting her search to the world via TikTok.

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BACKSTORY: TikTok Video Goes Viral as Woman Tries to Track Down the Wife of "Stephen in Louisiana"

If you've been hiding under a social rock or need a refresher on the whole "Stephen in Louisiana" saga you can go here, but basically, a dude was shooting his shot at this girl while on a bachelor's trip and things went south real quick after she realized he was married.

She posted a TikTok video, looking for "Stephen in Louisiana" and it exploded almost instantly; reaching folks as far as Japan and just about every other corner of the globe who were just as peeved with "Stephen's" alleged (and attempted) cheating ways.

Her video became somewhat of a rallying cry for women who were over the audacity of men who not only had the nerve to put that type of desperate energy into cheating, but also the fact that some men (like Stephen) take it a step further by insulting women who actively choose not to hook up with married men.

It didn't take long for Maddie to realize that her video had definitely reached people who were familiar with both Stephen and his wife who was reportedly pregnant and due in November.

After a pretty low-key week, Maddie returned to TikTok to give another update—and this one may be the grand finale. According to Perry, "the wife knows" and she is "aware of the video" that was posted about her husband, Stephen.

Maddie says she's been trying to get in touch with the woman but hasn't had success. She says her goal with her original video was to let the wife know what happened, and since she achieved that goal she was going to ask the wife if she wanted her to take the viral clips down.

While she wasn't able to talk to Stephen's wife personally, apparently her friends have been in communication and it doesn't seem like she has any desire to talk to Maddie about the situation.

The TikToker says that was totally understandable and while anything moving forward isn't any of her business, she did praise the "power of TikTok" and the fact that women could come together over this.

There were many who echoed that sentiment in her comments.

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But there were also a few folks who mentioned she may be facing some type of legal backlash, but of course, it could be someone simply trolling in the comments.

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Someone else pointed out that the innocent guy in the video may have been catching heat over the story as well.

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I guess in the end it's safe to say that in the state of social media that we live in, these situations can be a double-edged sword. Sure, #GirlCode is strong and this info is probably helpful for anyone on the wrong side of it, but the pain is also a reality.

But as someone pointed out in the comments, the blame shouldn't be on Maddie for that one—but instead, the person who caused this video to be created in the first place.

I'm interested to know your thoughts on that one. Sound off in the comments as we close this "Stephen in Louisiana" chapter for good.

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