There sure is a lot of chatter about a zombie apocalypse thanks to television series such as The Walking Dead and HBO's newest hit The Last of Us. Experts say that there is little to no chance that a fungus or virus could make non-living humans stumble about like a fat guy in a food coma at a Golden Corral, but if it's true then South Dakota may be as good a place as any to ride it out.

The writers at Insuranks looked at many factors to see which states would be the best to survive a zombie apocalypse and South Dakota ranks quite high for survival. They crunched numbers at looked at factors such as open space, lots of agriculture, and a lax attitude toward weapons. So, the states that are most ready for the zombies are:

1. Wyoming
2. Alaska
3. Vermont
4. North Dakota
5. South Dakota

Okay...good to know.

This is an amazing statistic from Google searches: Between March 2019 and March 2021, there was a 2082% increase in searches for "preparing for zombie apocalypse," a 1025% increase in searches for "when will zombie apocalypse happen," and a 120% increase in searches for "apocalypse weapons."

"The Walking Dead season 10 averaged 5.4 million viewers after many thought the show was dead (go figure). Americans still have the zombie itch since the finale was postponed, which left them gnawing for more insight on whether they could survive something like a Zombie Attack." ~ CableTV

Of course, getting out of Sioux Falls and other highly populated areas is key to survival. If we've learned anything from the Walking Dead and the Last of Us, cities will collapse and be overrun by zombies so it's best to get into sparsely populated areas, preferably with a silent weapon like a crossbow. Thanks for the tip, Walking Dead Daryl :)

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